Holidays in Asia, Sri Lanka

Guesthouse Sri Lanka, wonder of Asia

nicest beaches, crystal clear waters

Tangalle / Southcoast

Villa Araliya

now special offers

Global News Search

Who's online

We have 228 guests online

Search

A+ R A-
Floor Monkeys And Decentralization Of Risk by Jared Dillian, Mauldin Economics As most of you know, I used to be a clerk on the floor of the old P. Coast options exchange in San Francisco. What a place. I could tell stories about that floor for weeks. The craziest things you ever heard. But let’s […] The post Floor Monkeys And Decentralization Of Risk appeared first on ValueWalk.

Read more: ValueWalk

The latest round of negotiations for the Transpacific Partnership are set to wrap up Friday. Ministers from the U.S., Japan, Canada, and the nine other countries are gathered at a resort on the Hawaiian island of Maui to try to hash out the agreement’s final details. The negotiation process has stretched over five years, as negotiators have tried to find common ground across a slew of issues during calls, emails, video chats and periodic in-person meetings. As TPP negotiations come closer to completion, negotiators must tackle the most contentious issues. “As anyone who has been in trade negotiations knows, those final decisions are always the most difficult,” Michael Froman, the U.S. Trade Representative, said earlier this week. While negotiations have taken place in private, the TPP’s final sticking points have included sugar, dairy, state-owned enterprises, and the period of exclusivity granted to the makers of certain types of drugs. Outside the negotiation rooms, official advisors, congressional staff, trade groups, lobbyists and non-profit advocates roam the resorts’ lobby, using every spare plug to charge phone and laptops, meeting among themselves, and hoping to catch a moment with the delegates, either through official briefings or unguarded moments in the elevator or hotel restaurants. “I’ve adopted the Starbucks strategy,” says James Love with Knowledge Ecology International, a non-profit organization that focuses on intellectual property issues. “When I see someone come up to get a coffee and I see a blue [identification] badge, I know they’re a delegate.” He asks them how the negotiations are going, what areas they’re working on, and offers up his perspective on drug monopolies, among other IP issues. “It’s a bit like that guy who hits on every woman in the bar,” Love admits. “A lot of people don’t like to do it because they feel like they’re being a jerk or it’s a little bit annoying, but I’m willing to do that.” He’s chosen three issues to focus on as the trade enters its final stages of negotiation, based on where he thinks he can have the most impact. At this point, he says it’s too late for the long shots and focusing on the low-hanging fruit isn’t a good use of time. “Balance is the key term or catch phrase,” says a weary Auggie Tantillo, president of the National Council of Textile Organizations, who’s also prioritizing limited issues as negotiations wind down. He’s accepted that markets will open and has chosen to focus instead on what provisions might be put in place to ease the transition, such as eliminating tariffs gradually over time. These agreements are “never done until they’re done,” he says.

Read more: Latest Stories on Marketplace.org

A few weeks ago, we reported that it appeared German investigators were investigating the excellent German news site Netzpolitik, which covers a lot of the same issues that we do at Techdirt, with a similar sensibility. Netzpolitik had just published stories concerning plans to expand German bulk surveillance efforts to internet users, as well as plans by the German Secret Service to expand its internet surveillance capabilities. As part of this, the site (like we do) published source documents

Read more: Techdirt.

DENVER, Colorado--(BUSINESS WIRE)-- Acquisition of ITV Shares Liberty Global plc (“Liberty Global”) (NASDAQ: LBTYA, LBTYB, LBTYK, LILA and LILAK) announced today that it has acquired 138.7 million shares in ITV plc (“ITV”), thereby increasing its existing stake to a total of 398.5 million shares in ITV or approximately 9.9% of ITV’s ordinary shares outstanding. Liberty […] The post Liberty Global Increases Its Stake in ITV, the Leading Commercial Broadcaster in the U.K., to 9.9% appeared first on ValueWalk.

Read more: ValueWalk

Why You Should Dump Amazon & Buy Wal-Mart Now by Sure Dividend Amazon is now worth more than Wal-Mart. The two companies’ market caps are below: Amazon has a market cap of $246 billion Wal-Mart has a market cap of $233 billion At first glance, Amazon being more valuable than Wal-Mart doesn’t seem that unusual. […] The post Why You Should Dump Amazon & Buy Wal-Mart Now appeared first on ValueWalk.

Read more: ValueWalk

Salary benchmarking firm Emolument.com highlights that London investment bank analyst salaries are remarkably bunched together, with seven out of 10 banks paying their analysts between £68,000 and £71,000 in annual total compensation last year. There are several reasons for this, but the primary consideration is that the biggest half-dozen or so IBs are all competing […] The post London Bank Analyst Salaries: Who Pays The Best? appeared first on ValueWalk.

Read more: ValueWalk

Gibson has spent millions of dollars over the course of a decade trying to perfect the self-tuning guitar. But it wasn’t until this year the brand behind the iconic Les Paul started making automatic tuners a standard feature on most of its electric guitars. With one press of a button, tiny motors twist the tuning pegs and within seconds, the guitar is ready to play. The tuner is a small black box tucked out-of-sight, above the neck at the head of the guitar. “You know, people see it and they’re kind of taken aback at first,” says Craig Anderton, a long time musician-turned-executive vice president for Gibson. He remembers showing off the device to a longtime guitar tech in Santa Fe. "So I pushed the button and I strummed the strings and I watched it and he goes, ‘I can die now. I think I’m in heaven.’” Anderton says there’s a common misperception that a self-tuning guitar is only meant for beginners. He says it can save valuable time even for experienced musicians – whether they’re in the studio or on stage. "Once you try it, you can’t help but get addicted to it,” he adds. Well, not everyone. Some musicians complain the device is unreliable, and then there are the purists who say Gibson is tinkering with the guitar's timeless design. George Gruhn’s shop in Nashville sells mainly vintage guitars. “The 1959 sunburst Les Paul was perfect,” he says. “I’m hard pressed to think of anything that has improved in electric guitars from 1959 to the present.” Gruhn shakes his head at what Gibson is attempting. And he says there’s no need for it. He pulls an iPhone out of his pocket, sets it on the table and plucks at a nylon string classical while glancing at the screen. “Anybody who can’t learn to tune a guitar with a tuner app on their telephone isn’t going to learn how to play guitar,” Gruhn says. “This is a non problem.” The new Gibson models also cost more – up by 30 percent in some cases. But the company says the new technology accounts for only a small portion of that increase. Despite the critics, Gibson is pushing ahead with automatic tuning. First, electric guitars. Acoustics are next.

Read more: Latest Stories on Marketplace.org

Puerto Rico has debt problems. It's even been called the "Greece of the Americas." On Monday, the Puerto Rican government is due to repay another $60 million to bond holders, and the government is already preparing statements assuming it won’t have the cash.   It wouldn’t technically be a default. These are what are called moral obligation bonds, so they don’t have legal repercussions for non-payment. But it’s not just banks and bondholders affected. The "crisis has hit the island pretty badly," said Mariana Giusti, a Puerto Rico native whose family and friends still live there. She spoke from Peru, where she is working on a Ph.D. in Latin American studies. “People are just trying on the day to day to just make ends meet. I think things have been getting progressively bad over the past couple of years. So the news that we have to declare bankruptcy doesn't come as a big surprise." But Puerto Rico can't file for bankruptcy, even if the commonwealth wanted to. Federal bankruptcy laws block it from that option. Last week, the Hilton Condado Casino, which had been on the island for 40 years, announced plans to close. But the government is still hoping tourism will save the day. Mario Mercado, who will begin a sociology doctorate at Rutgers, in New Jersey, next year, spoke from San Juan. “Tourism is actually a hot-button issue," he said. "Since the government and the public funds are running low, they are now depending on private investors to develop basically everything.” Mario comes from a small town, Arecibo, and he said most of his city is depending on private developers to come in and fund tourist sites. "And through some calculation, they think trickle-down economics will help the Puerto Rico situation," he said. "Tourists coming in, spending money here, and then small business owners will benefit from this." In other words, the commonwealth and its cities want companies moving in instead of taking off. Even if Puerto Rico makes a debt payment next week, it’s not out of the woods. Its debt sits at about $72 billion. Puerto Rico is also in the middle of a historic drought. San Juan, the capital, has been forced to ration water to many residents. Mario says there's also a lot of uncertainty right now because the school term is set to begin. "How do you run a school without water?" Many Puerto Ricans have left the island for the mainland. Mariana says she would love to return to her native home. "But for personal and professional reasons, I think it's a bit of a long shot," she said. "But I kind of have the hope that at some point it will be possible to go back to the island." The latest Census projections say Puerto Rico will lose another half a million people by 2050.  Puerto Rico, saddled with billions in debt, has until Monday to repay about $60 million of that to bondholders. How did it reach this point? Here’s a brief history of economic issues that have plagued the U.S. territory: 1976: Puerto Rico gets a tax break that enables American companies to set up shop in the commonwealth without paying federal taxes. 1996: Congress gets rid of the tax break, phasing it out over 10 years.     2006: Puerto Rico sinks into a recession, and many businesses leave. Manufacturing jobs drop by almost half. 2007: The Great Recession hits, and three Puerto Rican banks go under. 2015: Puerto Rican Gov. Alejandro Garcia Padilla declares the territory’s debt “unpayable.” Puerto Rico avoids default in July by paying back about $1.3 billion for bonds and loans. 

Read more: Latest Stories on Marketplace.org

[CNW Group] – Media Advisory – Goldcorp Inc. officially inaugurates its Éléonore mine The post Media Advisory – Goldcorp Inc. officially inaugurates its Éléonore mine appeared first on King World News.

Read more: http://kingworldnews.com/media-advisory-goldcorp-inc-officially-inaugurates-its-eleonore-mine/

As a rule, I try to write about opportunities rather than threats. Nobody needs to be reminded how bad things are out there, but everyone is eager to hear what can be done about it. Sometimes, however, a new threat to our liberties is so outrageous that I must break my optimistic rule. After all, […] The post How to Protect Your Freedom With a Second Passport appeared first on ValueWalk.

Read more: ValueWalk

Thursday's GDP Report May Hold Big Surprises by Gary D. Halbert FORECASTS & TRENDS E-LETTER by Gary D. Halbert July 28, 2015 IN THIS ISSUE: Chair Yellen All But Promises Rate Hike This Year Why is the Fed So Preoccupied With Raising Rates? Thursday’s 2Q GDP Report Could Be a Surprise Annual GDP Revisions Could […] The post Thursday’s GDP Report May Hold Big Surprises appeared first on ValueWalk.

Read more: ValueWalk

Once again the IMF is back in the news in regards to Greece. The IMF staff told the board of directors Greece Disqualified from New IMF Program. Yet, Germany insists IMF be a part of the program. The reason for the latter is Germany will have to pony up lots more money if the IMF is not involved. The staff presented this message to the board this week, along with the message eurozone bailout lenders first need to agree on "debt relief". From the above link (Financial Times) ... The

Read more: Mish's Global Economic Trend Analysis

Former People's Liberation Army general Guo Boxiong has been caught up in an anti-corruption probe and expelled from the Party. Guo becomes the highest ranking military figure to be accused of corruption in over 60 years. China's Xinhua News Agency reports that he was removed from the party during a Politburo meeting. As a result of his […] The post Former Top General Expelled From China’s Communist Party appeared first on ValueWalk.

Read more: ValueWalk

[at Financial Times] – Antofagasta, the London-listed but Chile-focused miner, is spending $1bn on a 50 per cent stake in a copper mine owned by Barrick Gold as a first The post Antofagasta to buy Chilean copper mine from Barrick for $1bn appeared first on King World News.

Read more: http://kingworldnews.com/antofagasta-to-buy-chilean-copper-mine-from-barrick-for-1bn/

The United Kingdom has gone batsh*t crazy.  There’s simply no other way to put it.   Submitted by Michael Krieger, Liberty Blitzkrieg: I warned about Britain’s “war on toddler terrorists” earlier this year in the post: The War on Toddler Terrorists – Britain Wants to Force Nursery School Teachers to Identify “Extremist” Children. Here’s an excerpt: […] The post 3-Year-Old London Child Deemed “Extremist” and Placed in Government Reeducation Program appeared first on Silver Doctors.

Read more: Silver Doctors

The fact that both Obama and liberal commentators have brought up Australia numerous times in conjunction with new calls for gun control in the United States directly proves that full-scale gun confiscation is the agenda… This article was originally published by Alex Thomas at the Intellihub. Shortly after the shooting in a Lafayette, Louisiana theater, […] The post Liberal Media Openly Calls for Mass Gun Confiscation in America: “The Second Amendment Must Go” appeared first on Silver Doctors.

Read more: Silver Doctors

Despite near-term obstacles, Asia offers some very good and unique long-term investment opportunities that should not be ignored, argues HSBC. Herald van der Linde and Devendra Joshi of HSBC note in their July 29 research report titled: “The Flying Dutchman” that China’s continued reliance on debt and slower reform momentum continue to cloud equity markets. Asia […] The post Asia Presents Unique Long-Term Investment Opportunities: HSBC appeared first on ValueWalk.

Read more: ValueWalk

Significant changes are coming. Should the system buckle we can expect widespread rioting, panic and confusion…   Submitted by Mac Slavo, SHTFPlan: Economic forecaster Martin Armstrong, who is known for having accurately predicted major events like the Savings & Loan crash, the collapse of Japanese financial markets and the destruction of the Russian economy almost […] The post Top Economic Forecaster Warns: Have Cash On Hand To Survive For Three Months: “No Institution Is Safe” appeared first on Silver Doctors.

Read more: Silver Doctors

Britain is in the grip of a worrying trend. Our own Prime Minister compared migrants in Calais to insects when he called them a “swarm”. Meanwhile, internet comment sections relating to the refugees are filled with hatred and venom. Asylum seekers are referred to as “invaders”, and the trolls encourage the British authorities to shoot them, […]

Read more: azizonomics

Back on December 29 of last year, we explained how under the burden of its soaring current account deficit, and its its first primary fiscal deficit since 1998, not to mention numerous corruption scandals and a dysfunctional monetary policy, the Brazilian economy "just imploded." We also noted the main reason for the Latin American collapse: Brazil had for the past decade become China's favorite source of commodities, and now that China suddenly no longer needed commodities, the Brazilian

Read more: Zero Hedge

Page 1 of 3821