Global News Search

Holidays in Asia, Sri Lanka

Guesthouse Sri Lanka, wonder of Asia

nicest beaches, crystal clear waters

Tangalle / Southcoast

Villa Araliya

now special offers

Who's online

We have 98 guests online

Search

 

Psiram

A+ R A-
Today KWN is putting out a special piece which features an incredible chart showing that despite the recent weakness, gold and the gold shares may be coiled for a major upside explosion. These are charts that the big banks follow closely, as well as big money and savvy professionals. David P. out of Europe sent us the key chart that all KWN readers around the world need to see.

Read more: http://kingworldnews.com/kingworldnews/KWN_DailyWeb/Entries/2014/10/20_Despite_Struggle,_Gold_&_Shares_Coiled_For_Upside_Explosion.html

LAS VEGAS (Reuters) - The regulator of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac said on Monday it was developing rules to let Americans buy homes with down payments as low as 3 percent, part of a push to boost access to credit.

Read more: Reuters: Top News

SANAA (Reuters) - At least 33 people were killed in a suicide bombing and gun attacks in central Yemen, tribal sources and medics said on Monday, as al Qaeda fighters seized a Yemeni city in a new challenge to the central government.

Read more: Reuters: Top News

The impact of low oil prices is juicing American families’ pocketbooks in a way similar to a stimulus package, especially if crude stays low. Call it what you want: crude oil dividend, discount, energy quantitative easing. Oil is 25 percent cheaper since the summer. And for drivers, the stimulus is instant. “Every additional dollar or two you save at the pump you can use as disposable income right away,” says economist Ed Hirs of Hillhouse Resources and the University of Houston. “ Now you have more money for fast food. Or the six-pack of beer that you've been foregoing the past year or two.” If oil prices stay low, and many bet it will, the savings will add up to a $200 billion domestic annual stimulus, estimates Citigroup. That’s about the size of the congressional stimulus in 2008. Citi figures the global economic boost is $1.1 trillion – again, annually. Economist Stephen Brown at the University of Nevada-Las Vegas figures the typical American family saves $40 a month with today’s prices. “Consumers in Washington D.C., New York and California, among a variety of areas in the United States will all see benefits,” Brown says. But, he says, fortunes flip for energy producers. States like North Dakota, Wyoming and Oklahoma had benefited from high prices. Similarly, global petro-states like Venezuela are also hurting from low prices. “It limits the ability to be able to spend on the more expensive social programs you have within Venezuela,” says global oil analyst Jamie Webster of consultancy IHS-CERA. “It just puts additional pressure on the government there.”

Read more: Latest Stories on Marketplace.org

So there has been all kinds of volatility on Wall Street lately — triple digit ups and downs. Well, consider this: 27 years ago yesterday, October 19, 1987, was 'Black Monday.' The Dow was off 22 percent that day which came out to 508 points. The next day, known as 'Terrible Tuesday,' nearly caused the New York Stock Exchange to collapse.  A similar drop today? 3607 points. All this to say: context truly is everything.

Read more: Latest Stories on Marketplace.org

Monday was a dark day for IBM investors. The company's stock price fell by more than 7 percent after it released a disappointing quarterly earnings report. But alongside that announcement came a more unconventional one: IBM is selling its chipmaking business to GlobalFoundries. But in this "sale," GlobalFoundries is collecting the check: $1.5 billion in cash over the next three years.  "It’s the deal of a century," says Dan Hutcheson, who follows the industry for VSLI research. The key is to look beyond the headline number. While IBM is paying GlobalFoundries in cash over the next three years, GlobalFoundries will supply chips for IBM servers for the following ten years--inputs that are key for IBM's legacy hardware. "I know a billion and a half sounds like a lot, but it’s probably a deal for IBM, too," says Hutcheson. "If you only look at the headline cash number, you are missing a lot of the story," says Rob Saloman, professor at the NYU Stern School of Business. Acquisitions are complicated, and those complications can make payments to the acquirer economically sound.  "As a matter of fact, there’s another example where this happened, which is Daimler-Chrysler’s spin-off of Chrysler. In effect, Daimler paid Cerberus to take Chrysler off its hands," Saloman says.  In this case, there were tax benefits to be had, and the ire of the U.S. government to be avoided. Such deals are rare--Saloman doesn't believe there's been another this year--but aren't unheard of.  "They’re almost always manufacturing-type businesses, right?" says Peter Cowen, adjunct professor at UCLA Anderson School of Management. "Ones that have heavy overhead, certain amount of infrastructure, certain amount of scale of things that need to unwind if they can’t find a buyer." In other words, costly businesses — that would be even costlier to shut down.

Read more: Latest Stories on Marketplace.org

On October 6, I noted German Factory Orders Slump 5.7%, Most Since January 2009. The previous month was up 4.9%, so I averaged the two months noting "The average result is a decline of 0.4% per month, for the last two months. That process also means four consecutive months of decline."German numbers were particularly volatile allegedly due to timing of school holidays, but there is no way to smooth out four consecutive months of decline as anything other than overall weakness.Germany Slashes

Read more: Mish's Global Economic Trend Analysis

DALLAS (Reuters) - Weeks of worry about Ebola infection ended on Monday for several dozen people who came off watch lists in the United States, but more than 260 others were still being monitored for symptoms as the U.S. government ramped up its response to the virus.

Read more: Reuters: Top News

Finally, the long awaited appearance our series Masters in Business is now on Apple iTunes! All of our prior interviews are here, as well as all of the podcasts extras. And, all of our future guest interviews will show up here as well! Click to subscribe!      

Read more: The Big Picture

VIENNA (Reuters) - Iran is taking further action to comply with an interim nuclear agreement with six world powers, a monthly U.N. atomic agency report showed, a finding the West may see as positive ahead of a November deadline for clinching a long-term deal.

Read more: Reuters: Top News

GENEVA (Reuters) - U.N. experts questioned Israeli officials on Monday over alleged rights abuses ranging from the demolition of Palestinian houses to mistreatment of detainees and limited Palestinian access to water.

Read more: Reuters: Top News

Apple Pay launches today, and many are predicting the company - at an advantage with millions of existing iPhone users - could bring mobile payments into the mainstream. Many banks are aggressively advertising the service, the Verge reported, as part of a race to become the default card on users' lock screens. Apple will report earnings after markets close today. In the meantime, here's what we're reading - and the numbers we're watching - Monday. 43 people At the 21-day mark since Thomas Duncan was admitted to a Texas hospital and diagnosed with Ebola, 43 of the quarantined contacts have been released, among them Duncan's fiance and her son. Officials pleaded for compassion as their reintegrations began, the Washington Post reported. Additionally, Senegal and Nigeria were both cleared of Ebola over the weekend. 20 seconds The length of Snapchat's very first ad, a commercial for a movie based on a board game. Snapchat, which is valued at $10 billion, hasn't made money yet, but that could change with the introduction of ads. Universal didn't actually use Snapchat's camera to make a "native" video, AdAge reported, but it did edit the trailer for "Oujia" to look like the app's "stories." 1 That's how many albums have gone platinum this year. Only the soundtrack to Disney's "Frozen," which has moved 3.2 million copies, has the distinction. Every other record has floated under 1 million in sales. By this time last year, Forbes reported, five albums had passed the 1 million mark. 10 percent The approximate percentage of American Indian and Alaska Natives who have earned a bachelor's degree or higher, compared to about 30 percent of all U.S. adults. Natives have the lowest educational attainment rates of all ethnic and racial groups in America. The American Indian College Fund, founded 25 years ago, was created to assist the country’s more than 30 tribal colleges and universities. These are federally-funded schools located on or near native lands. 1 billion The tech industry likes to talk about "The Next Billion." It's shorthand for the next billion people that will become online consumers and that makes them the target of tech giants like Google, Facebook and Samsung. This new, targeted market lives in emerging economies like China, India, Brazil and Africa, and have very different needs than the American smartphone user.

Read more: Latest Stories on Marketplace.org

RIO DE JANEIRO (Reuters) - President Dilma Rousseff is gaining momentum but remains locked in a dead heat with challenger Aecio Neves ahead of Sunday's runoff to Brazil's presidential election, a survey by pollster MDA showed on Monday.

Read more: Reuters: Top News

I found this today while researching materials for a related project, and I thought it was pretty interesting:   Source: Entrepreneur

Read more: The Big Picture

DALLAS (Reuters) - Weeks of worry about Ebola infection ended on Monday for several dozen people who came off watch lists in the United States, but more than 260 others were still being monitored for symptoms as the U.S. government ramped up its response to the virus.

Read more: Reuters: Top News

VIENNA (Reuters) - Iran has taken further action to comply with the terms of an extended interim nuclear agreement with six world powers, a monthly U.N. atomic agency update on the accord's implementation showed on Monday.

Read more: Reuters: Top News

It's closing in on Halloween, so we're going to get financially spooky. We want to hear your stories of the scary side of finance. Have you ever fallen victim to a scam? What was that like for you? What did you learn? Tell us about it by email, or on Twitter, we're @MarketplaceWKND.

Read more: Latest Stories on Marketplace.org

STOCKHOLM (Reuters) - It has all the makings of a Cold War thriller -- an emergency military deployment with stealth ships and helicopters hunting for a foreign submarine in the Stockholm archipelago. Grainy photographs of a mysterious vessel. Sightings of a black-clad man wading in shallow coastal waters.

Read more: Reuters: Top News

The number of year-round public schools is small, but growing fast, according to a report by the Congressional Research Service. Which region of the United States has the most year-round schools?

Read more: Latest Stories on Marketplace.org

Page 7 of 6321